California, Rhode Island Among Most Aggressive States Fighting COVID-19

As the number of confirmed coronavirus cases surpasses 60,000 in the U.S., states across the country have ordered extensive shutdowns and issued orders to have residents stay-at-home as much as possible to help curb the spread of COVID-19.

However, according to a new study from WalletHub, some states have been acting more aggressive in trying to curb the spread of the disease than others. Many states have moved forward in taking the advice from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in closing schools, banning small gatherings, and legally enforcing 'social distancing' practices as much as possible.

Other states have worked to ensure that those who are affected by the virus will be covered by insurance plans or increasing funding and supplies for hospitals. New York has even taken the step of manufacturing its own hand sanitizer to help deal with shortages.

WalletHub examined data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia and compared it across 46 key metrics, including: the number of tests for COVID-19 conducted in the state, to what the state's lawmakers are doing to combat the coronavirus.

California, Rhode Island and Maryland were among the most aggressive states in the country in their response to the coronavirus pandemic. California, which currently has the third most cases in the U.S., received high marks for its efforts in preventing the spread of the virus and containing it. Several major industries in the state are also vulnerable to the virus' effects as Hollywood has all but ceased production and ports up and down the coast have come to a standstill. The state of nearly 40 million was also dinged for having the lowest total Public Health Emergency Preparedness Funding per capita.

Meanwhile, states like Tennessee, Nevada and Mississippi were among the least aggressive states in their response to COVID-19 according to WalletHub's survey. Tennessee was ranked as #45 in having the highest number of influenza and Pneumonia deaths per capita in the country, with Mississippi ranked dead last in the survey.

One reason why Nevada was ranked so low is thanks to its public hospital system quality, which was ranked as being #45 among the 50 states with the District of Columbia coming in last, despite spending the most on public healthcare per capita in the nation.

On the other hand, if you're looking for the state with the highest quality public hospitals, you'll need to visit South Dakota, Minnesota or Iowa. Minnesota also has the lowest number of people who are considered a high-risk of contracting a severe form of the disease, with Colorado and Hawaii following closely behind.

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Photos: Getty Images, Wallethub

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